Chocolate French Bulldogs: Discover Pros and Cons!

Chocolate French Bulldogs have been around for a while now, and since they are indeed beautiful, their popularity has increased in social media. More and more people are interested in getting Chocolate French Bulldogs Puppies, still, many more are making questions that we deem important to safe keep the breed’s standard. In this article you’ll find:

  • The truth behind Chocolate Frenchies.
  • Information about their genetics and types.
  • Are they safe to get?
  • And more interesting tips about this type of Frenchie.

When you finish reading, you’ll have a solid idea of an answer on the final question; should you get a Chocolate Frenchie? Let’s get right into it!

Chocolate French Bulldogs: Another beautiful fad color

Chocolate French Bulldogs are those who present different shades of brown, and brown also present in the different patterns that may appear in a French Bulldog. It’s well known that the accepted colors of French Bulldogs are white, cream, and fawn, and brindle and pied accepted markings. That’s why this is often seen as another fad color, created by bad breeders to sell more dogs. And this is partly true.

There’s been a lot of controversies online surrounding this coat color in Frenchies, mostly because this color is not natural in them (we’ll get into genetics in a while). Because of that, breeders that produce this type of dog are banned from KC around the world, and other communities.

Still, as we said above, this is indeed a beautiful color in a French Bulldog, thus there’s an army of people defending it.

Genetics of a Chocolate French Bulldogs

The genes associated with this coat color are very similar to those seen in Blue French Bulldogs because they are also “dilute genes”. This means they water-down other colors. In the case of Blue Frenchies, the D-locus is in charge, diluting black and other colors. For the brown variation, the B-locus is the one that interacts with black color and other genes in the A-locus.

For it to appear, two copies of the allele must be present (coming from both parents). If only one is present, the gene will interact differently.

This creates the different shades of brown or other colors that may appear. However, it’s important to note that there are two types of Chocolate French Bulldog; one that can be tested and found in their DNA, and one that doesn’t appear in tests.

Some people believe that non-testable Chocolate Frenchies were introduced through mixing.

Are they good or bad?

There’s a good amount of confusion related to Brindle French Bulldogs because sometimes they appear to be dark brown. We can assure you that it’s just an illusion due to the interlacing of black and fawn!

Most of the time unaccepted coat colors are this way for a reason. The main reason to avoid getting Chocolate French Bulldogs is that most of the time they have yellow eyes (in both types). This is linked to issues like blindness and cataracts developing at a young age. Of course, this affects the quality of life of dogs directly, thus it’s not seen as a good practice to do on purpose.

However, some people believe that this is not a strict rule for every single Frenchie and that some of them are safe to get because the genes of cataracts and blindness can be found and eliminated from litters using genetics.

Another reason is that the color is not part of the standard, so they’re not accepted to protect it.

Conclusion

So, should you or not be open to getting Chocolate French Bulldogs? Well, that depends totally on you. We believe that, even though there’s some more testing to be done, some of them can become good pets. Now, for the safekeeping of the breed’s standard, we do not entirely support this practice. We love French Bulldogs as they are, yet if this will pose threats to their health and quality of life, we’re not up to the risk.

Aside from that, we love the standard versions of Frenchies we can get, as they are immensely beautiful already. Why change this?

So, would you get a Chocolate French Bulldog? Let us know in the comments!