Piebald French Bulldog: Discover Pros and Cons!

You’re seriously mesmerized by Piebald French Bulldogs if you’re like us. They are an amazing piece of natural art. They are undeniably beautiful, and one of the rarest colors that’s not a “fad color” in French Bullies. This coat color is recognized by all of the KC around the world, yet it’s a difficult color to find.

Here you’ll find all the information about the Pied French Bulldog; the right description (for shows and AKC), how they are bred, and more interesting facts about this variation. Let’s get right into it!

So, what Are Piebald French Bulldogs?

Piebald French Bulldogs have a dominantly white coat, with markings of different sizes of Brindle and Fawn colors throughout their coats. They are recognized by the AKC, along with Fawn, Cream, and Brindle, all of them in different shades. Pied or Piebald is not a color, it’s a pattern of colors that mix. As you will notice below, they’re easy to recognize among different colors.

A common confusion among people is that Pied Frenchies are black and white, but they’re not. Check out they’re exact descriptions below:

  • Pied or Brindle Pied: Pied Frenchies are those with a mostly white coat with markings of Brindle around their coat. They are the most common version of the Pied Frenchie, so they’re simply called Pied, instead of Brindle Pied. The colors of the Brindle markings can vary within the limits of the breed’s standard. They can be black with fawn or cream. For show standards, they must be predominantly white, the Brindle markings should be delineated, and ticking is acceptable, yet not desired. Also, Pied Frenchies of great quality show delineated brindle markings that are beautifully distributed and even symmetrical. This is hard to achieve, and because of that, it’s hard to see show-quality pied Frenchies.
  • Fawn Pied: The only difference between this type and the Pied Frenchie, is that the markings are fawn; a much lighter brownish coloration. There is a wide definition of fawn, so the shades of this color vary a lot. They can be dark fawn, light fawn, or anything in between. The same show standards apply. Since Brindle is the dominant color in French Bulldogs, it’s rather hard to see Fawn Pied French Bulldogs, even more in competitions.

Another key factor considered in shows for both versions of the Pied Frenchie is that their lips, eyelashes, and other aspects of their face should be black, instead of having another color. Most of them have a “mask”.

How are Piebald French Bulldogs bred?

Both variations of the Pied Frenchie are beautiful to the eye. However, since getting high-quality Pied French Bulldogs is rather hard, they’re not as usual in competitions. Normally, it’s easier to spot them as pets, and the ones you’ll see will – probably – have ticking (spots), washed colors instead of solid ones, and blurred colors.

To breed a Pied French Bully, at least one of the doggy parents must either be Pied or have the gene. This is passed down to their litter, and there are different variations in the breeding process that breeders must take into account:

  • Two Pied parents: They will produce a 100% Pied litter.
  • One Pied parent and one with other accepted color: The Pied coloring is a recessive gene, so this litter will not have Pied puppies. All French Bulldogs Puppies will have the color of the other parent, whatever it is. Still, the puppies will have the Pied gene in them.
  • One Pied parent with and one with another color, but with the pied gene: This match will have a 50% of pied puppies. The rest will have the color of the other parent, plus the Pied gene.
  • Two parents with the pied gene: At least one of the puppies, or 25% of them, will be Pied, and at least 50% of the puppies will carry the Pied gene.

As you can see, there’s a lot of thought into this process. Even more, the production of show-quality Pied Frenchies is much harder when compared, because determining that the standard for shows is nearly impossible. How can you tell if a puppy will have perfectly defined markings!? Show-quality Pied French Bulldogs and even champions are used in this process to obtain perfect Pied puppies, which augments considerably the price of the litter. Because of this, one pet-quality French Bulldog puppy can cost up to $2000 or $2500, a show-quality anything from $5000 to $10.000, and a Pied French Bulldog puppy up to an incredible $15.0000 or more!

Common misconceptions about Piebald French Bulldogs

Some people believe Pied Frenchies are somewhat different from other versions of the breed, but they’re not! They are as any Frenchie would be, with the same personality outlines and physical description. Most people believe they are not an accepted version of the breed, like the Blue or Grey Frenchie, yet they are; it’s just weird to see them.

If you see any difference in personality or physical difference, maybe you’re looking at a mix (which is much easier to breed!). Another common misconception that is seemingly carved into people’s minds is that the Pied Frenchie is a Black and White French Bulldog. If you see one, we can assure you that it’s another thing, not a Frenchie. As we said, it’s much easier to create Black and White Frenchies than Pied Frenchies, and what you’re seeing is probably that.

Conclusion

Now that you know how a Pied Frenchie looks, you’ll know how to tell one apart from a Boston Terrier. If not, well, Boston Terriers are black and white instead of Pied or Fawn Pied! If you’re interested in getting a Pied Frenchie, you can check out our guide on the best breeders around the USA, so you can ask around if they breed this type of Frenchie. After all, they are amazing pets, loving companion, and beautiful wing-dogs.

Are you ready to get your Pied Frenchie?